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Just…. Look – Part III: Possibilities January 11, 2019

Posted by ajoyfulpractice in Abhyasa, Changing Perspectives, Dharma, Faith, Gratitude, Healing Stories, Hope, Karma, Life, Love, Meditation, Mysticism, New Year, Peace, Vairagya, Wisdom, Yoga.
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“I dwell in Possibility – / A fairer House than Prose –

– excerpt from poem by Emily Dickinson

“One is not born a genius, one becomes a genius…. One is not born, but rather becomes a woman.”

– excerpts from The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir

I grew up hearing, and then using, some variation of the idiom “I wasn’t born yesterday” – meaning, “I’m not naïve enough to buy whatever you’re selling.” It’s a funny turn a phrase, but, just the other day, I started thinking about it seriously. I started thinking about the flip-side of being naïve which, in its extreme, is jaded. I started thinking about the beginner mind versus the expert mind.

“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s mind there are few.”

–  Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, by Shunryo Suzuki

In Zen Buddhism, Shoshin is the concept of “beginner’s mind,” whereby a person is open and receptive to possibilities, because they lack (or suspend attachment to) preconceived notions. I often equate this Zen Buddhist concept to the niyama (“Internal observation”) of santosha (“contentment”) in the 8-limb philosophy of yoga. To the Western mind, being content with something sometimes gets associated with “settling for something” – implying that there is something more and we are missing out. However, in the philosophy of yoga, santosha is accepting and appreciating what is with a certain kind of wonder or awe and, like a child, asking what’s next.

Funny thing is, in gaining experience, maturing, and losing our childish naiveté, we also lose our possibilities.  Turns out, being born yesterday comes with advantages. Being born yesterday means we are more open and more receptive to possibilities.

“There are two who enjoy the fruits of their good deeds in the world, having entered into the cave of the heart, seated (there) on the highest summit.”

– from Katha Upanishad I 3.1

 

“The concept of desire coming from the soul or essence may seem strange since, by definition, the soul is eternal and changeless. But the Vedas explain that the soul has two aspects: it is complete, whole, and eternal, in a permanent state of oneness with the Absolute, and at the same time, it desires to fully express itself and its divine nature in the world.”

– excerpt from The Four Desires by Rod Stryker

In The Four Desires, Rod Stryker breaks down the four desires of the spirit. Keep in mind that this explanation includes the idea that there are two parts to the soul – a part that is whole and understands its wholeness and a part that wants to know and be known. The second part of the soul is the part that desires. It desires a purpose; it desires the means to achieve that purpose; it desires pleasure; and it desires liberation. If we have a soul at birth (or, as some would argue, at conception), then that means we have these desires at birth. While there are definitely socioeconomic advantages and disadvantages which affect prenatal and neonatal experiences (and, in doing so may appear to limit a child’s possibilities right off the bat), the bottom line is that if we were born yesterday we haven’t had time to learn limitations and fears. If we were born yesterday, we have acquired very little of life’s baggage. Thus, our lives are unwritten books.

As I approached my 50th birthday, people kept asking me the same basic questions: How does it feel? Any regrets about your life? My answers were the same: I could spend a whole lot of time thinking about how my life is different from what I expected, but, bottom line, I never pictured so much of what is beautiful and wonderful in my life at this moment.

Yes, at different moments in my life I had some wild ideas about what I was going to be when I grew up and I’ve spent a good portion of my life letting those wild ideas go. Or, so it would appear. A few years back, however, I realized the reality is that I am living a lot of my wild ideas. They came true – just not the way I expected them. When I think about it, the only places where I have “regrets” are the places where I have not been open and receptive to possibilities.

The video below is opportunity to explore the possibilities in your heart. It is an opportunity to step back from all your baggage and all the things you think (consciously, unconsciously, and subconsciously) about yourself, your life, and your circumstances. Step back from all the things you’ve learned you can’t do. Step back from all the things life’s hard experiences have taught you that you can’t have. Regardless of your age, sex, gender, ethnicity, ability, or other demographic, step back from who you think you are – and, therefore, step back from all the things you believe that you can’t be.

(Click here if you don’t see the video. A transcript of the video is coming soon. This exercise includes a body/chakra scan.)

 

### NAMASTE ###

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