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Exploring & Having Our Say August 18, 2021

Posted by ajoyfulpractice in Books, Changing Perspectives, First Nations, Healing Stories, Life, One Hoop, Philosophy, Wisdom, Women, Yoga.
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With the exception of today’s class details (and a few type-o corrections), this was originally posted August 18, 2020.

 

“The large woolf found here is not as large as those of the atlantic states. they are lower and thicker made shorter leged. their color which is not effected by the seasons, is gray or blackish brown and every intermediate shade from that to a creen [cream] colored white; these wolves resort [to] the woodlands and are also found in the plains, but never take refuge in the ground or burrow so far as I have been able to inform myself. we scarcely see a gang of buffalo without observing a parsel of those faithfull shepherds on their skirts in readiness to take care of the mamed wounded. the large wolf never barks, but howls as those of the atlantic states do.”

 

– quoted from journal notes by Meriwether Lewis, dated May 5, 1805

What happens when you explore, really get to know your mind and know your spirit? You start to understand what your body and mind (even your spirit) are capable of doing. You start to notice how things are connected, related, and how working on or with one part of your mind-body-spirit affects other parts – physically, mentally, even energetically and spiritually. And once you’ve explored and gotten to know parts of yourself, parts of yourself start speaking up and wanting their say. Every part of yourself wants to be considered in the work that affects you (and them). This is not unreasonable. This is, also, the way in which your mind, body, and spirit are like a country or sovereign nation – even like a continent or ocean.

Any environment is going to be full of entities (people and things) that are affected by each other and outside factors. Those entities have ways of communicating, but we have to listen – and explore, and then listen some more.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of two explorers, Meriwether Lewis (born today in 1774) and Margaret “Mardy” Murie (born today in 1902). Charged by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the Louisiana Territory in 1804, Meriwether Lewis was quiet, intellectual, and kept meticulous journals. Those journal entries are highly prized today for their detailed information about the flora, fauna, and people the expedition met along the way. The expedition, often called the “Corps of Discovery,” included William Clark; Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau; and Clark’s slave, York.

Note that while Meriwether Lewis’s mother had a plantation full of slaves – slaves that he, at one time, was meant to supervise – he left the plantation and did not have a slave during the expedition. He did, however, hire a free Black man, John Pernia, as his valet later in his travels. (Although, John Pernia was reportedly not paid his full wages and petitioned President Jefferson for them after Meriwether Lewis’s death.) Also of note, is the fact that Meriwether Lewis granted Sacagawea (a Shoshone member), Touissant, York, and Pernia the right to vote during expedition meetings. In other words, he allowed them to have their say.

 

“Dear Son,

Don’t forget to be a good boy and help Mrs. Catt put the RAT in ratification.”

 

– quoted from the letter Mrs. Phoebe “Febb” Ensminger Burn wrote to her son Tennessee Representative Harry Burn in 1920

 

“I know that a mother’s advice is always safest for her boy to follow.”

 

– Tennessee State Representative Harry Burns on why he voted “aye” for suffragists, even as he wore a red carnation

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified today in 1920, giving women the right to vote. Ultimately, the determining vote was cast by a man who carried a woman’s (his mother’s) note in his pocket. So, you could say, Febb Burn had her say and, in doing so, allowed women like Margaret Murie to have their say. Although, even at 18 (which she was when the amendment was ratified) “Mardy” was making her thoughts known. In 1924, she was the first woman to graduate from the University of Alaka-Fairbanks and she spent her 8-month honeymoon exploring Alaska with her husband, Olaus. Her notes and reflections became the book Two in the Far North. Her life’s work and her devotion to wildlife preservation led her to be known as the “Grandmother of Conservation.”

“To live a full life, you must have something beyond your household, beyond your family, to broaden your existence.”

 

– Margaret “Mardy” Murie

We are “re-zooming” online classes! Please join me today (Tuesday, August 18th) at 12 Noon or 7:15 PM for a virtual yoga practice on Zoom where we will listen deeply. Use the link from the “Class Schedules” calendar if you run into any problems checking into the class. Give yourself extra time to log in if you have not upgraded to Zoom 5.0. You can request an audio recording of this practice via a comment below.

Tuesday’s playlist is available on YouTube and Spotify. [Look for “08182020 Exploring & Having Our Say”]

 

“If we allow ourselves to be discouraged, we lose our power and momentum. That’s what I would say to you of these difficult times. If you are going to that place of intent to preserve the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge or the wild lands in Utah, you have to know how to dance.”

 

 

– from Two In the Far North by Margaret “Mardy” Murie

 

 

 

### WHERE WILL YOU GO? ###

First Friday Night Special #8: “Having Our Say / Let’s Get Loud” June 4, 2021

Posted by ajoyfulpractice in "Impossible" People, Books, Healing Stories, Music, Philosophy, Women, Yoga.
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“This is a vulnerable place, because the throat chakra is where the inside comes out.”

– quoted from “Chakra Five: Sound – The Communication Chakra” by Anodea Judith, PhD

“The throat chakra has been referred to as the Holy Grail of the chakras because it holds information from all the chakras…. Within the sacred container of the throat chakra, all of this energy and information is ‘metabolized’ – broken down and put back together into a form that becomes your unique expression in the world.”

– quoted from “chapter 5: The Chakras – Your Body’s Energy Stations” in Energy Medicine: Balancing Your Body’s Energies for Optimal Health, Joy, and Vitality by Donna Eden with David Feinstein, Ph.D.

“Surrender Personal Will to Divine Will”

– Fifth Chakra Sacred Truth, quoted from Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing by Caroline Myss, Ph.D.

The throat chakra is obviously and often associated with communication – “having one’s say,” saying something, speaking truth to power, “using your words,” etc. Interestingly, Caroline Myss also associates it with personal will (and determination) and, in particular, the constant balancing act (she sometimes uses the word “struggle”) between Personal Will and Divine Will (you can also think Universal Will or Immanent Will). While we can see the balance in the person who always seems to say the right thing at the right time and in the right way (wise speech and all), we are more likely to notice the imbalance inherent in someone who doesn’t speak up for themselves, is silenced by others, or speaks too much. We may notice, in ourselves, tightness in the neck and/or throat when we are dealing with certain situations and/or people. Additionally, we see evidence of fifth chakra imbalance when someone is negatively characterized because they say what’s on their mind.

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote, was approved by Congress today in 1919. It was passed with 56 “ayes” and 25 “nays,” in large part because of 24-year old Harry T. Burn, Sr. of Tennessee, the Republican Representative from Tennessee who was the youngest congressman and who was expected to vote against the amendment. Mr. Burn voting “nay” would have killed the legislation; however, if anyone had gone deeper than what was being communicated on the outside (by the red carnation on his lapel), they would have known that Mr. Burn’s vote was inspired by the strong-willed words of his mother: Febb E. Burn.

“Your every choice, thought and feeling has biological, environmental, social, personal and global consequence. Actions motivated by personal will that trusts Divine authority, gives you the richest power.”

– quoted from “Morning Visual Meditation” (focus for Chakra 5) by Caroline Myss

Please join me for a very vocal “First Friday Night Special” tonight (June 4th), 7:15 PM – 8:20 PM (CST) that focuses on the neck and throat (chakra). Use the link from the “Class Schedules” calendar if you run into any problems checking into the class. You will need to register for the 7:15 PM class if you have not already done so. Give yourself extra time to log in if you have not upgraded to Zoom 5.0. You can request an audio recording of this practice via a comment below or by emailing myra (at) ajoyfulpractice.com.

If you are using an Apple device/browser and the “Class Schedules” calendar is no longer loading, you may need to upgrade your browser, or you can email me at myra (at) ajoyfulpractice.com at least 20 minutes before the practice you would like to attend.

This practice is accessible and open to all. We will “warm up” the body with poses, mantras, and a little “guided inquiring/journaling.”

Prop wise, this can be a kitchen sink practice. It will be especially handy to have something you can sit upon; a blanket or towel; and extra layers (as your body may cool down during this practice). I also encourage you to have something with which you can take notes.

Friday’s playlist is available on YouTube and Spotify. (NOTE: The YouTube playlist features video footage not available on Spotify. The Spotify playlist currently contains extra tracks added by the app.)

In the spirit of generosity (“dana”), the Zoom classes, recordings, and blog posts are freely given and freely received. If you are able to support these teachings, please do so as your heart moves you. (NOTE: You can donate even if you are “attending” a practice that is not designated as a “Common Ground Meditation Center” practice, or you can purchase class(es). (Donations to Common Ground are tax deductible; class purchases and donations directly to me are not necessarily deductible.)

### HAM, HAM, HAM ###

“Re-zooming” Exploring – Part 1 August 18, 2020

Posted by ajoyfulpractice in Books, Changing Perspectives, First Nations, Healing Stories, Life, One Hoop, Philosophy, Wisdom, Women, Yoga.
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[My apologies for the late notice, but online classes are “rezooming” today at 12 Noon and 7:15 PM.]

“The large woolf found here is not as large as those of the atlantic states. they are lower and thicker made shorter leged. their color which is not effected by the seasons, is gray or blackish brown and every intermediate shade from that to a creen [cream] colored white; these wolves resort [to] the woodlands and are also found in the plains, but never take refuge in the ground or burrow so far as I have been able to inform myself. we scarcely see a gang of buffalo without observing a parsel of those faithfull shepherds on their skirts in readiness to take care of the mamed wounded. the large wolf never barks, but howls as those of the atlantic states do.”

– quoted from journal notes by Meriwether Lewis, dated May 5, 1805

What happens when you explore, really get to know your mind and know your spirit? You start to understand what your body and mind (even your spirit) are capable of doing. You start to notice how things are connected, related, and how working on or with one part of your mind-body-spirit affects other parts – physically, mentally, even energetically and spiritually. And once you’ve explored and gotten to know parts of yourself, parts of yourself start speaking up and wanting their say. Every part of yourself wants to be considered in the work that affects you (and them). This is not unreasonable. This is, also, the way in which your mind, body, and spirit are like a country or sovereign nation – even like a continent or ocean.

Any environment is going to be full of entities (people and things) that are affected by each other and outside factors. Those entities have ways of communicating, but we have to listen – and explore, and then listen some more.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of two explorers, Meriwether Lewis (born today in 1774) and Margaret “Mardy” Murie (born today in 1902). Charged by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the Louisiana Territory in 1804, Meriwether Lewis was quiet, intellectual, and kept meticulous journals. Those journal entries are highly prized today for their detailed information about the flora, fauna, and people the expedition met along the way. The expedition, often called the “Corps of Discovery,” included William Clark; Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau; and Clark’s slave, York.

Note that while Meriwether Lewis’s mother had a plantation full of slaves – slaves that he, at one time, was meant to supervise – he left the plantation and did not have a slave during the expedition. He did, however, hire a free Black man, John Pernia, as his valet later in his travels. (Although, John Pernia was reportedly not paid his full wages and petitioned President Jefferson for them after Meriwether Lewis’s death.) Also of note, is the fact that Meriwether Lewis granted Sacagawea (a Shoshone member), Touissant, York, and Pernia the right to vote during expedition meetings. In other words, he allowed them to have their say.

“Dear Son,

Don’t forget to be a good boy and help Mrs. Catt put the RAT in ratification.”

– quoted from the letter Mrs. Phoebe “Febb” Ensminger Burn wrote to her son Tennessee Representative Harry Burn in 1920

“I know that a mother’s advice is always safest for her boy to follow.”

– Tennessee State Representative Harry Burns on why he voted “aye” for suffragists, even as he wore a red carnation

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified today in 1920, giving women the right to vote. Ultimately, the determining vote was cast by a man who carried a woman’s (his mother’s) note in his pocket. So, you could say, Febb Burn had her say and, in doing so, allowed women like Margaret Murie to have their say. Although, even at 18 (which she was when the amendment was ratified) “Mardy” was making her thoughts known. In 1924, she was the first woman to graduate from the University of Alaka-Fairbanks and she spent her 8-month honeymoon exploring Alaska with her husband, Olaus. Her notes and reflections became the book Two in the Far North. Her life’s work and her devotion to wildlife preservation led her to be known as the “Grandmother of Conservation.”

“To live a full life, you must have something beyond your household, beyond your family, to broaden your existence.”

– Margaret “Mardy” Murie

We are “re-zooming” online classes! Please join me today (Tuesday, August 18th) at 12 Noon or 7:15 PM for a virtual yoga practice on Zoom where we will listen deeply. Use the link from the “Class Schedules” calendar if you run into any problems checking into the class. Give yourself extra time to log in if you have not upgraded to Zoom 5.0. You can request an audio recording of this practice via a comment below.

Tuesday’s playlist is available on YouTube and Spotify. [Look for “08182020 Exploring & Having Our Say”]

NOTE: This post has been updated with the appropriate links. The substitute playlist is still available on YouTube and Spotify. (I will update this post with links after the Noon class.)

“If we allow ourselves to be discouraged, we lose our power and momentum. That’s what I would say to you of these difficult times. If you are going to that place of intent to preserve the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge or the wild lands in Utah, you have to know how to dance.”

 

– from Two In the Far North by Margaret “Mardy” Murie

 

 

 

### WHERE WILL YOU GO? ###